Space, the Moon, and I

14 02 2010

This article makes me kind of happy:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/35390304/ns/technology_and_science-space/

I learned to read at age three, sitting in my father’s lap. He would hold me and we would read comic books. About age five I began using the public library. I exhausted their supply of books on earthquakes, volcanoes, hurricanes, and tornadoes. Then I went on to dinosaurs and archaeology in general. I still remember how enthralled I was by Roy Chapman Andrews’ chronicles of his adventures in China and other parts of the far East exploring for fossils.

Next came a novel entitled “Danger, Dinosaurs!” by Richard Marsten. It was science fiction, and I was hooked. All through my extreme youth I read about space exploration and other planets, solar systems, even other galaxies. The universe was mine, all between the covers of a book.

Earthrise

 And now the International Space Station is really beginning to take shape. I know I am too old to go into space, but oh how I would love to visit the space station. Robert A. Heinlein wrote a story, “The Man Who Owned the Moon” about a millionaire who felt the same way I feel, and was able to make it to the moon to die. How glorious it would be to view the Earth from the Moon. And Mars, ai-ya, to stand on the red sand of the planet Mars, well, that would be indescribable.

Alas, I cannot and will not, but at least I can live vicariously and read about the astronauts on the internet, on the effing internet, hoo, real science no-longer-fiction at the tips of my fingers—I can read about the space station as I read about Roy Chapman Andrews 57 years ago. I should call someone on my cell phone, cell phone, ha!, on my little handheld computer, but, it’s still too early in the day.

Holy Moley Addendum: or maybe, Addendum: Holy Moley. I was just toodling around the web and discovered that Richard Marsten was a pen name for Evan Hunter. Crikey, that means the book might even have been well-written. But the few remaining Winston Science Fiction Series copies are too rich for my blood. Oh I long to go once more, dinosaur hunting in a time machine. Wait, I can do that with Ray Bradbury, too.

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4 responses

16 02 2010
Kathy Fairchild

Well, old friend, if you go I want to join you. Experience shared is pleasure multiplied. Tea at earthrise, what a joy.

3 04 2010
Rickster

Since Roy’s name came up… if interested to know more about this 20th century adventurer, explorer from Beloit WI you can find it at http://www.roychapmanandrewssociety.org
We’re working to keep the sense of adventure he inspires alive. 🙂

3 04 2010
chadao

Thanks for the link, Rickster. RCA was the man. I will post this at Facebook, too.

3 04 2010
chadao

Hey Rickster, is there a nomination procedure for the RCA award? I want to nominate Canadian Jeff Fuchs. Read his book The Ancient Tea Horse Road.

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